Gonorrhea becoming resistant to only treatment left

**The following is from msnbc.com by Dr. Tyeese Gaines dated August 9, 2012 at 1:25 PM which I thought I’d share here.

The sexually transmitted disease, gonorrhea, colloquially known as “the clap,” may soon have no drugs left to treat the infection.

Lab studies are showing an increasing resistance to the type of drugs that doctors use to treat gonorrhea, called cephalosporins. That leaves only a few options, which are not as effective.

“Cephalosporin-resistant gonorrhea could potentially mean untreatable gonorrhea,” says Dr. Gail Bolan, director of the Division of STD Prevention at the CDC. “Untreatable gonorrhea is a real possibility.”

Gonorrhea has already become resistant to every other class of drug used to treat it. For that reason, the CDC is urging doctors to immediately change their practice and begin treating with an injectable cephalosporin and adding one of two oral medications — azithromycin or doxycycline.

Certain patients will need to return to the doctor in a week for a repeat test to ensure the medications worked. Any partners in the 60 days prior to diagnosis should be treated as soon as possible.

Gonorrhea is transmitted through sexual contact with the penis, vagina, mouth or anus of an infected partner, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Ejaculation does not have to occur to pass the disease. It can also spread from a mother to her child during childbirth.

Over 300,000 cases are reported each year, and it’s estimated that the number is closer to 700,000, since many people go undiagnosed or untreated, and continue to pass it on.

Untreated, gonorrhea has major implications for women, causing infertility, ectopic pregnancy — a life-threatening condition where the pregnancy is outside of the uterus — and a deeper infection that spreads into the uterus, fallopian tubes and the pelvis.

Contracting gonorrhea makes it more likely to transmit and become infected with HIV as well, for both men and women.

The CDC currently recommends annual gonorrhea testing for women with more than one partner, or in communities where gonorrhea is rampant.

While the rates of gonorrhea have been at recent lows, African-Americans are still affected disproportionately. For every one white man or woman with gonorrhea, 20 African-Americans are infected. The rates have more than doubled since 2006 among young black men ages 20 to 24.

The CDC says higher rates of resistance are seen in the Western part of the United States and among men who have sex with men.

Researchers are actively looking for adequate treatment options for this highly contagious disease, according to Bolan.

“There is one promising treatment in the pipeline,” she says, adding that researchers are also looking at new combinations of existing drugs.

Dr. Tyeese Gaines is a physician-journalist with over 10 years of online viagra print and broadcast experience, now serving as health editor for theGrio.com. Dr. Ty is also a practicing emergency medicine physician in New Jersey. Follow her on twitter at @doctorty.

Untreatable gonorrhea spreading worldwide

The following is a an article from msnbc.com news services dated June 6, 2012 that I thought was appropriate to share.

LONDON — A potentially dangerous sexually transmitted disease that infects millions of people each year is growing resistant to drugs and could soon become untreatable, the World Health Organization said Wednesday.

Scientists reported last year finding a “superbug” strain of gonorrhea in Japan in 2008 that was resistant to all recommended antibiotics and warned then that it could transform a once easily treatable infections into a global health threat.

“This organism has basically been developing resistance against every medication we’ve thrown at it,” said Dr. Manjula Lusti-Narasimhan, a scientist in the agency’s department of sexually transmitted diseases. This includes a group of antibiotics called cephalosporins currently considered the last line of treatment.

“In a couple of years it will have become resistant to every treatment option we have available now,” she told The Associated Press in an interview ahead of WHO’s public announcement on its ‘global action plan’ to combat the disease.

The WHO said those fears are now reality with many more countries, including Australia, France, Norway, Sweden and Britain, reporting cases of the sexually transmitted disease resistant to cephalosporin antibiotics.

“Gonorrhea is becoming a major public health challenge,” said Manjula Lusti-Narasimhan, from the WHO’s department of reproductive health and research. She said more than 106 million people are newly infected with the disease every year.

“The organism is what we term a superbug — it has developed resistance to virtually every class of antibiotics that exists,” she told a briefing in Geneva. “If gonococcal infections become untreatable, the health implications are significant.”

Gonorrhea is a bacterial sexually transmitted infection which, if left untreated, can lead to pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy, stillbirths, severe eye infections in babies, and infertility in both men and women.

Once considered a scourge of sailors and soldiers, gonorrhea — known colloquially as online prescription viagra the clap — became easily treatable with the discovery of penicillin. Now, it is again the second most common sexually transmitted infection after chlamydia. The global health body estimates that of the 498 million new cases of curable sexually transmitted infections worldwide, gonorrhea is responsible for some 106 million infections annually. It also increases the chances of infection with other diseases, such as HIV.

It is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases in the world and is most prevalent in south and southeast Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. In the United States alone, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the number of cases is estimated at around 700,000 a year.

The WHO called for greater vigilance on the correct use of antibiotics and more research into alternative treatments for so-called gonococcal infections.

The emergence of drug-resistant or superbug strains of gonorrhea is caused by unregulated access to and overuse of antibiotics, which helps fuel natural genetic mutations within the bacteria.

Experts say an added problem with gonorrhea is that its strains tend to retain their genetic resistance to previous antibiotics even after their use has been discontinued.

Major producers of antibiotics for gonorrhea include global drug making giants GlaxoSmithKline, Pfizer and Abbott, as well as Indian firms like Cipla.

The WHO said it is not yet clear how far or wide drug resistance in gonorrhea has spread, as many countries lack reliable data. “The available data only shows the tip of the iceberg,” said Lusti-Narasimhan.

“Without adequate surveillance we won’t know the extent of resistance…and without research into new antimicrobial agents there could soon be no effective treatment for patients.”

‘Like passing razor blades’
Francis Ndowa, formerly the WHO’s lead specialist for sexually transmitted infections, said gonorrhea has not only adapted to elude antibiotics but developed less painful symptoms, increasing its survival chances.

“They used to say that if you have urethral gonorrhea you go to the toilet to pass urine, it would be like passing razor blades. It was that painful,” he explained. “Now people with gonorrhea sometimes…only notice the discharge if they look when they pass urine, it’s not that painful anymore.

“So the organism has readjusted itself to provide fewer symptoms so that it can survive longer. It’s an amazing interaction between man and pathogen.”

Experts say the best way to reduce the risk of even greater resistance developing – beyond the urgent need to develop effective new drugs – is to treat gonorrhea with combinations of two or more types of antibiotic at the same time.

This technique is used in the treatment of some other infections like tuberculosis in an attempt to make it more difficult for the bacteria to learn how to conquer the drugs.

Gonorrhea can be prevented through safer sexual intercourse. The WHO said early detection and prompt treatment, including of sexual partners, is essential to control sexually transmitted infections.

Condoms and STD Safety

Minimize Your Risk For STDs With Proper Condom Use

You may not realize it, but a condom could actually preserve your life. Statistics show that Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) are a widespread problem throughout the world. In the United States alone, approximately 12 million people are affected by STDs yearly. The cold hard facts are that there are serious problems caused by STDs, and anyone who is sexually active or who plans to be sexually active needs to understand about things such as the use of condoms and STD safety.

There are many health problems associated with STDs that people may not know about. For instance, women may develop cervical cancer as an effect of an STD. The ability for a woman to get pregnant may also be diminished or lost altogether because sterility is often caused by STDs. If a woman with an STD does get pregnant, tubal pregnancies are common, and these have been known to be fatal to the unborn child and to the pregnant woman. Babies born to infected women may have severe damage or even die because of effects of these diseases. The brain, kidneys, and heart may be damaged in a person who has an STD. STDs such as the HIV virus can cause death to the infected individuals.

STDs are very serious and should be taken seriously by everyone. The surest way to not contract an STD is abstinence, but for many people, that is not a choice they prefer. Having a monogamous relationship where the couple has no other partners and they do not have an STD is another way to prevent the problem. While condom use is not 100% safe, it can greatly reduce the risk of becoming infected by an STD, including the AIDS virus.

Condoms and STD safety go hand in hand. While condoms are also used as a method of birth control, other methods of birth control such as the pill are not effective in reducing the risk of STDs. This is because a condom presents a physical barrier to the transfer of bodily fluids from one person to another. These bodily fluids can carry the germs that transmit STDs, and without the barrier of a condom, can easily pass from one partner to the other.

Even if your partner appears to be healthy, if they have been intimate with infected people where to buy viagra or have shared needles with a person who was infected with an STD they could still be a carrier. If you are not 100% sure of your partner, you should use condoms. While no condoms are 100% effective, those designed to help prevent disease can greatly reduce the risk of passing along this type of infection.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6805590

STD Testing

Your general health includes many things-including physical, emotional, spiritual and social elements.All of these elements work together to provide you with a certain level of wellness, which can equal quite often your level of happiness and life satisfaction. One of the areas that adults also need to consider is the status of their sexual health. Sexuality is a big part of an adult’s life, and it is important to be in the know and on top of any problems or difficulties, so that they can quickly be resolved.

For some people, talking about their sexual health can be very uncomfortable, but let us just tell you that by ignoring anything that might come up, your level of comfort can be greatly reduced-perhaps more than how it would be to suffer the temporary discomfort of talking to someone or being examined. The truth is that almost every person that is sexually active can be in danger of coming across an uncomfortable situation, such as contracting a sexually transmitted disease (STD). When to get tested can vary from situation to situation, but the general good idea is at least once a year, if not as often as you think might be necessary.

Although STDs are some of the most difficult diseases to catch since you have to have close and personal contact, they are common enough that you should have regular STD screening done if you are sexually active with multiple partners or a new partner. An STD can still be transferred even when having intercourse with someone who claims it is their first time. This is because STDs can be transferred through oral and anal sex.

If you are a person who has multiple partners, or is just changing to a new partner, it is strongly recommended that you consider getting tested. There are quite a number of STDs that can be contracted, and not all of them are particularly loud about demonstrating negative side effects right away. In fact, Chlamydia, one viagra femele of the diseases that is most often reported, is only actively affecting about half of the people who have it. However, just because they don’t know about the disease does not at all mean that it can’t be passed on, and affect another individual quite negatively. Be careful, and be considerate to yourself and those who are involved with you.

You should always practice safe sex by using condoms even for oral sex. However, condoms are not 100% guarantees in preventing STDs although it can help reduce the risk of catching one. The most effective method of preventing sexually transmitted diseases is to not have sex. But since that’s not a reality, doing what you can to protect yourself and your partner, including regular STD testing, could and should be a reality.

For women, it may seem easier to keep up on your sexual health. Most women, in fact, have an annual checkup, including a Pap smear, that can enable them to ask the questions that need to be asked, and be examined and tested by the right authorities on a fairly regular basis. It may be more difficult for men to do the same. However, the importance is just as high. It’s really up to you when to get tested, but it’s important to do it on a regular basis.

What Are Some Ways to Get STD's?

Although most of us went through some sort of health class or other in our middle school years, much of the information we had supposedly learned concerning sexual health has managed to be forgotten, or at least selectively remembered. Even if you are sexually active, it is very important for you to understand some of the risks involved, and be educated on the ins and outs of the situations that may present themselves.

Sexually transmitted diseases, (also called STD’s) are health problems that do just as the title describes: transmitted in some sort of sexual way. There are many different ways for this to occur, but each has something to do with some level of intimacy, and is usually involving two or more partners.

Thus, in order to avoid problems with any kind of sexually transmitted diseases, the best way is to simply abstain from any kind of intimacy with another individual. However, because our bodies seem to be programmed to need some sort of sexual gratification, it may be more important to simply be careful, and smart.

Usually, these diseases are transmitted through bodily fluids. Thus, as one individual chooses to have intercourse, his or her fluids can transfer to the body of the other person. If these fluids are infected with a disease, the other individual has a great chance of also contracting the condition. Sexually transmitted diseases can be delivered through the practices of intercourse, oral or anal sex, or sometimes even with the exchange of saliva that occurs during kissing.

There are many different kinds of STDs, and each runs its own list of symptoms, problems, and possibilities for treatment and/or a cure. There are many sources that you can go to in order to learn specific information on certain diseases. It is not necessarily a sure thing to suppose that just by having sex with someone you will automatically contract an STD, but it is smart to be precautious, and prevent that possibility.

The best way, as discussed before, is to abstain from sex in general. Other options to avoid problems with STDs include using protection, such as condoms, when having intercourse.

It is also a very good idea to stay on top of your sexual health. At least once a year, have a physical exam by a trained physician who can assess your sexual health. Encourage your partner to do discount cialis without prescription the same. By doing these things, you can be in a much safer zone, and possibly never have to worry about dealing with the effects of a sexually transmitted disease.

How Do I Know If I Have an STD?

The rate of sexually transmitted diseases is on the rise. There are many people that are uninformed on the subject of sexually transmitted diseases, which leaves the problem even more disastrous because they are not able to recognize the warning signs of these diseases and infections and risk spreading them to other people without knowing. The most dangerous thing about a sexually transmitted disease, or STD, is misinformation. May people still believe that you can get an STD from a door handle or a toilet seat but do not know what the symptoms are or what to do if they actually contract one of these sometimes deadly diseases. One of the best things that you can do is learn as much as you can about these diseases and protect yourself so you never have to ask, “how do I know if I have an STD?”

Sexually transmitted diseases, or STD’s are infections of the body that are caused by parasites, bacteria, and viruses. These infections are transmitted mainly through sexual contact, although there are other ways to contract them. These diseases are also passed by blood-to-blood contact by sharing needles for drugs, body piercings, tattoos, child birth, or even breast feeding. Since these diseases can be deadly, it is important to learn about the diseases, how to protect yourself, and how to identify symptoms of the disease so you can get early treatment if you do become infected.

Some of the most common things to look for if you are wondering, “how do I know if I have and STD?” are unusual discharge from the male penis, painful urination, sore genital and anal area, unusual discharge form the vagina in females, intense itching, stomach cramps (not associated with menstrual cycle) and sores around the vagina and anus. These are the most common symptoms for an STD, and if you are experiencing on or more, you should seek medical treatment immediately so your physician can get you on a treatment plan as soon as possible.

One of the biggest things that you will want to do is protect yourself against STD’s so you never have to worry about having one. Always make sure you use some sort of protection against these diseases. You may want to make checkup appointments with your doctor if you are sexually active, to test for the STD’s that are out there. Remember, STD’s are dangerous and sometimes deadly diseases that can be prevented. Never leave yourself in the situation wondering, “how do I know if I have an STD?”

Can You Get STD’s From a Toilet Seat or Towel?

One of the biggest dangers in today’s society is the threat that STD’s pose to people. Sexually transmitted diseases are some of the most harmful and life threatening diseases that a person can get, so it is important to get some information to protect yourself and the people around you. The first thing that you should do is research these sexually transmitted diseases so you can answer questions like “can you get STD’s from a toilet seat of towel?”

The first thing that you should know about a sexually transmitted disease is that it is an illness that is transmitted sexually between humans. That means, for the most part, that you have to have sexual intercourse with a person that has an STD to get one. These diseases are also called sexually transmitted infections to be a little broader. There are very few other ways that you can get an STD from a person but other ways include, drug needles, passing the disease to a child through childbirth, and even breastfeeding. Oral (Herpes can be transferred by kissing) and anal sex is also ways to get STD’s. The organisms that cause these diseases are not very tolerant of environments beside the human body, which means that most of them will be destroyed when they are not in the body. Therefore, the answer to the question “can you get STD’s from a toilet seat or towel?” is: most likely no. There are a few of these infections that could possibly be transmitted through a towel or seat and include crabs and scabies. The risk of getting these from either a toilet seat or a towel is very minimal.

Crabs (pubic lice) can only live away from the human body for about 24 hours making infection from a toilet seat very small, especially in a bathroom that is well maintained and cleaned often. Scabies is an itchy skin disease that is caused by mites that, again, can only live away from the body for about 24 hours and therefore, very hard to contract from a toilet seat or a towel.

Many people have heard that you can get herpes from a toilet seat, but this risk is also very small because the virus that causes the disease dies almost immediately after leaving the body.

If you are wondering “can you get STD’s from a toilet seat or towel?” you will most definitely want to do some research and learn as much about these diseases and infection as you can. Knowledge is power and in the case of STD’s it is also protection.

What is Gonorrhea and Who’s at Risk?

Contracting a sexually transmitted disease can change your life forever-and you may not even be aware of it until it is too late. You may have heard horror stories of people who have suffered from the effects of a sexually transmitted disease (also commonly referred to as an STD,) and you probably would rather not experience that for yourself. In your quest to become more educated on the subject, we’ll begin with one of the most common sexual diseases, Gonorrhea (Neisseria gonorrhoeae bacterium).

Anyone who is sexually active can get gonorrhea (also known as the clap). This STD tends to breed within warm, moist environments-most often the reproductive tracts, such as the fallopian tubes, cervix, and uterus of women. Other places that gonorrhea can dwell are the urethra (in both males and females,) as well as the mouth, eyes, and throat. It can even be found in the lower extremities of the body, such as the anus.

By coming in contact with the genitals of an infected person, gonorrhea can be easily transferred. An infected mother can transmit it to her child during childbirth. Sexual partners can transfer it to each other during intimacy. The disease is curable, but can be caught again, especially if both partners aren’t treated at the same time.

The symptoms differ between genders, and may not actually manifest themselves for about 3-5 days after the disease is contracted. Sometimes it even takes up to a month for symptoms to really begin to show up. Many men have no symptoms at all, while others might experience pain and/or burning while urinating, a yellowish and sometimes bloody discharge from the penis. There may be swelling and pain in the testicles as well.

For women, the symptoms may be mild, if they show at all. However, vaginal and bladder infections can occur. It is also painful for women to urinate, and may have excessive genital discharges as well, including bleeding between periods. If left untreated the disease can have adverse affects on a woman’s ability to have children.

Gonorrhea should be immediately treated, in order to avoid other, more serious health complications in the future. This disease can evolve into things like pelvic inflammatory disease, or chronic pelvic pain. For men, it can even become a problem to the point that it leads to infertility.

It is important for you and your partner to take the time to get checked periodically so that you know the condition of your sexual health. Try to avoid multiple partners, and consider using protection while having sex. A urine test is based on amplification of the DNA that is present in Gonorrhea. By doing these and other things, you can avoid the painful effects of the sexually transmitted disease called gonorrhea.

Are STD’s Curable?

Sexually transmitted diseases can be some of the most uncomfortable, annoying things a person can get. Especially because it comes from such a personal and intimate situation, discussing these things with someone who can help to treat it can be an intimidating process. If you suspect that you may have a sexually transmitted disease, it is likely that you have many questions: Which disease do I have? Is it curable? What am I going to do now? By learning a little bit of general information about the nature, development, treatment, and prevention of sexually transmitted diseases (often referred to as STDs), you can save yourself a lot of heartache.

Our world is becoming more and more open to sexual activity, and traditional behaviors and beliefs are taking a backseat to more recently formed ideas. Whether or not it is because of this change in mindset, the recorded amount of people diagnosed with sexually transmitted diseases has greatly increased. There is great danger in having unprotected sex, and once you have contracted a sexually transmitted disease, you then have to deal with a number of uncomfortable consequences.

There are a lot of different kinds of STDs, and each runs an individual course. Some are curable. Some can easily be treated. Some are easily passed on, and others may not show their faces for some time after you actually contract them. To help you see the variety of STDs out there a little bit better, consider the following information:

Gonorrhea is a bacterial STD that can sometimes remain unnoticed for quite some time. Genital Warts (also known as the HPV – human papilloma virus) is one that will definitely be noticed, but cannot be cured. The symptoms that stem from this infirmity can be controlled, however.

Chlamydia is possibly the most common STD contracted by sexually active people. Some of the symptoms include pain during intercourse, as well as abnormal discharge from the individual’s sexual organs. However, Chlamydia is a disease that can be treated, and cured, if dealt with appropriately.

One of the most dangerous, incurable STDs, however, is AIDS/HIV. This disease is transmitted through semen, vaginal secretion, blood, and breast milk, and can actually be deadly. Its progress can be monitored and somewhat controlled, but a cure is yet to be found for this disease.

By being aware of the sexual health of yourself and your partner, as well as ways to protect each other from possible harm is a great way to avoid problems with these sexual diseases.

Should I Get STD Tested?

Your general health includes many things-including physical, emotional, spiritual and social elements. All of these elements work together to provide you with a certain level of wellness, which can equal quite often your level of happiness and life satisfaction. One of the areas that adults also need to consider is the status of their sexual health. Sexuality is a big part of an adult’s life, and it is important to be in the know and on top of any problems or difficulties, so that they can quickly be resolved. You might ask, “How Often Should I Get STD Tested?” You’ll find this and other important answers as you continue on here.

For some people, talking about their sexual health can be very uncomfortable, but let us just tell you that by ignoring anything that might come up, your level of comfort can be greatly reduced-perhaps more than how it would be to suffer the temporary discomfort of talking to someone or being examined. The truth is that almost every person that is sexually active can be in danger of coming across an uncomfortable situation, such as contracting a sexually transmitted disease (STD). How often should I get STD tested? The answer can vary from situation to situation, but the general good idea is at least once a year, if not as often as you think might be necessary.

If you are a person who has multiple partners, or is just changing to a new partner, it is recommended that you consider getting tested. There are quite a number of STDs that can be contracted, and not all of them are very loud about demonstrating negative side effects right away. In fact, Chlamydia, one of the diseases that is most often reported, is only actively affecting about half of the people who have it. However, just because they don’t know about the disease does not at all mean that it can’t be passed on, and affect another individual quite negatively. Be careful, and be considerate to yourself and those who are involved with you.

For women, it may seem easier to keep up on your sexual health. Most women, in fact, have an annual checkup, including a Pap smear, that can enable them to ask the questions that need to be asked, and be examined and tested by the right authorities on a fairly regular basis. It may be more difficult for men to do the same. However, the importance is just as high. And so, “should I get STD tested?” It’s really up to you, but it’s important to do it on a regular basis.